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International Criminal Jurisdictions


1. Latest developments at the United Nations Retour à la table des matières

- On 19 February 2014, the Security Council held a public debate with the Secretary General, as well as the Lithuanian and Chilean Foreign Affairs Ministers on the promotion and strengthening of the rule of law in the maintenance of international peace and security.

M. Ban Ki-moon recalled that the rule of law was inherently linked to the maintenance of peace and security and to conflict prevention. It was an integral part of the mandate of peacekeeping operations and special political missions. However, the examples of Mali, DRC, Syria or the CAR showed that efforts were still needed. The Lithuanian Foreign Affairs Minister recalled that in countries emerging from conflict, the rule of law was a legitimate framework to meet the civilian’s requests. It was essential to restore it in order to rebuild institutions. For the Chilean Foreign Affairs Minister, the Security Council needed to ensure follow-up action for cases investigated and refer to the International Criminal Court crimes against humanity, war crimes and genocide perpetrators. It was the best way to fight against impunity.

The Permanent Representative of France welcomed the exemplary of peacekeeping operations and of the United Nations in the field of the rule of law, and more specifically the Secretary General’s policies, in particular of zero tolerance for sexual abuse and of due diligence on human rights. The entire personnel of the Organization had to be aware of these rules in order to be irreproachable. The Permanent Representative also insisted on the adequacy of the mandates of peacekeeping operations and special political missions to the real needs with regard to the rule of law, as well as on the contribution that peacekeepers could make to help national authorities to cooperate with the ICC. He finally recalled that the adaptation of the United Nations to transnational threats such as piracy or the trafficking of drugs and natural resources. In the Security Council, France would continue to support the objective of promoting the rule of law. The emergency was nowadays in the Central African Republic. It was vital, along the security action, to act now in order to get the institutions up and running and to restore the authority of the State.

Following this debate, the Security Council adopted a presidential statement on 21 February 2014.

- On 18 December 2013, the Security Council adopted with 14 votes in favor and one abstention (Russia), resolution 2130 (2013) which extends to the 31st of December 2014, or until the end of actual trials, the mandate of the judges of the International Penal Court for Ex-Yugoslavia.

- On 5 December 2013, the Security Council met in the presence of Mr. Meron, President of the International Criminal Tribunal for former Yugoslavia (ICTY), Mr. Joensen, President of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), and of their respective Prosecutors, Mr. Jallow (Rwanda) and Mr. Brammetz (former Yugoslavia), in order to review the progress achieved by both courts in the achievement of their missions with a view to closure and the progress of residual mechanisms.

The ICTY would not be able to complete all trials activities for the end of 2014, while the ICTR has finished its work in first instance. Appeal procedures of this supplier would however not be completed in time. Mr. Meron and Mr. Joenson nevertheless reiterated their determination to respect the most stringent procedures in order to respond to those challenges, while smoothly transferring the essential tasks to the residual Mechanisms. Those could then carry out judicial activities and other essential duties, such as the oversight of both Courts’ archives.

The representative of France recalled that the ICTY implemented together highly complex cases, which was responsible for the sliding of the schedule. However, he recalled the trial to achieve its activities as soon as possible. Concerning the ICTR, all States must cooperate with it to relocate the acquitted persons and to arrest the last three fugitives who must be judged by the residual mechanism when then may be apprehended.

- On 15 November 2013, the Security Council held a vote on the draft resolution presented by several African countries requesting the postponement by one year of the trials for crimes against humanity of the Kenyan President and Vice-President at the ICC. The draft resolution received 7 votes in favor and 8 abstentions. It was not adopted, 9 votes being required for an adoption.

In his explanation of position, the Representative of France reiterated the will of France, as a partner of the African Union and an ally of Kenya, to respond to the Kenyan concerns. A majority of the Council Member States, however, considered that the suspension of proceedings under Article 16 of the Rome Statute was not necessary and that there were other alternatives. The Representative of France recalled that proposals expressed by various States were on the table of the Assembly of States Parties to the ICC Status, which will begin on 20 November. This meeting should meet the expectations of Kenya as regards changes in procedure for the trial in order to find solutions allowing the Kenyan leaders to fulfill their duties, in line with the integrity of the Rome Statute. France had therefore abstained from voting on the text submitted to the Security Council in order to continue the dialogue, particularly within the circle of the Assembly of States Parties to the ICC Status.

- On 12 November 2013, the Representative of Rwanda informed the Security Council members on his intention to submit to the Council a draft resolution requesting, under article 16 of the Rome statute, the postponement by one-year of the trial at the ICC of the Kenyan President and Vice-President.

In the following consultations, the Representative of France reiterated the will of France to respond to the concerns of Kenya. He proposed that the Security Council examine the draft resolution after the scheduled meeting of the ICC States Parties. This meeting should allow to respond to the concerns of Kenya regarding the modalities of the trial to take into account the high responsibilities of Kenyan President and Vice-President.

- On 31 October 2013, a delegation of high-level representatives of the African Union including the Foreign Ministers of Kenya, Ethiopia, Mauritania, Senegal, Namibia and Uganda met in an informal meeting with the members of the Security Council. Mr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the Foreign Minister of Ethiopa encouraged the Security Council, on the basis of article 16 of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, to defer for one year the ICC trial against Kenya’s President, Uhuru Kenyatta, and the Vice-President, Mr. William Ruto. They are being prosecuted for their responsibility in the post-election violence at the end of 2007 in Kenya.

The Representative of France recalled that this meeting with the African delegations was only the beginning of a dialogue with the African Union, not the end. At the same time, at The Hague, the ICC announced that the opening of Mr. Kenyatta’s trial was being postponed to 5 February 2014.

- On 12 June 2013, the Security Council held a public debate with the Presidents and the Prosecutors of the International Criminal Tribunal for former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and Rwanda (ICTR). Despite the persistence of long delays in trials, they all welcomed the important work undertaken by these tribunals to fight against the impunity of perpetrators of crimes against humanity, war crimes and genocide perpetrators, and thereby promoting the rule of law, international justice and contributing to all different processes of national reconciliation.

France, along with the members of the Security Council, called for the full cooperation of all member states to provide effective support to international justice in the fight against impunity.

- On 22 March 2013, the members of the Security Council adopted a press statement welcoming the surrender of Bosco Ntaganda to the International Criminal Court.

- On 17 December 2012, the Security Council adopted resolution 2081 extending the mandate of the judges of the ICTY, with 14 votes in favour and one abstention.

- On 12 December 2012, the Security Council unanimously adopted resolution 2080 extending until 30 December 2012 the tenure of five judges of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda.

- On 17 October 2012, the Security Council held an open debate on the reinforcement of the Rule of Law with a focus on the role of the International Criminal Court. The Secretary General insisted on the vital role to play for the Security Council in assisting the Court.

In his statement, the Permanent Representative of France welcomed the increasing number of States Parties to the Rome Statute, as well as the announcement by Cote d’Ivoire and Haiti to ratify it. He deplored the absence of seizure of the Court in cases such as the situation in Syria, which unveiled the insufficient cooperation between the Council and the Court. There was no follow up on the implementation of the Council resolutions concerning the Court. The directives issued by the Prosecutor’s office had to be strictly implemented.

- On 29 June 2012, the Security Council unanimously adopted resolution 2054 submitted by Guatemala, extending, on an exceptional basis, the tenure of three judges of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda until 31 December 2012.

- On 7 June 2012, the Security Council heard the briefing by Judge Theodor Meron, President of the International Criminal Tribunal for former Yugoslavia (ICTY), and Judge Vagn Joensen, President of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) and their Prosecutors, on the work of the Tribunals. The Presidents and the Prosecutors welcomed the progress made on the Completion Strategy and the transition to the residual mechanism pursuant resolution 1966.

The Prosecutor of the ICTY, along with the Representatives of France, Germany and the United States, condemned the denial by the newly elected President of Serbia, Tomislav Nikolic, of the genocide in Srebrenica.

The Representative of France commended the efforts undertaken by the Tribunals, and called upon all states to cooperate with the ICTR for the arrest of the remaining fugitives and the relocation of those who had been acquitted by the tribunal.

- On 5 June 2012, the Security Council met in public session, at the request of France, to discuss the implementation of the resolution 1593, which referred the atrocities committed in Darfur to the International Criminal Court.

The Prosecutor of the ICC, Luis Moreno-Ocampo, noted that the government of Sudan had failed to comply with the resolution, as new crimes had been committed and arrest warrants against President Bashir and three prominent government personalities had not been implemented. He underlined that the impunity of Sudanese officials was a challenge to the authority of the Security Council and suggested that its members and regional organizations implement the arrest warrants.

In his statement, the representative of France supported Mr Ocampo’s proposal to consider new judicial and operational initiatives and called upon Security Council members, in particular the state parties to the Rome statute, to comply with their commitments.

- On 29 February 2012, the Security Council unanimously adopted resolution 2038 submitted by Guatemala, appointing Mr. Hassan Bubacar Jallow from Gambia as Prosecutor of the International Residual Mechanism in charge of the residual functions of the International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, for a term of four years starting March 2012.


- On 21 December 2011, the Security Council unanimously adopted resolution 2029 extending until 30 June 2012 the terms of office of the permanent and ad litem judges of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda.


- On 16 December 2011, the International Criminal Court’s (ICC) Pre-Trial Chamber I agreed by majority not to confirm the charges against the leader of the Rwandan Hutu rebels, Calixte Mbarushimana, and to order his release; he does however remain subject to a travel ban imposed by the United Nations.


- On 7 December 2011, Judge Kahn presented to the Security Council his report on the work of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda following UNSCR 1534 (2004). Judge Meron, President of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia presented to the Security Council his report on the progress of the work of the ICTY.


- On 29 June 2011, the Security Council unanimously adopted resolution 1993 extending the terms of office of the trial and appeals judges until 31 December 2012 or until their cases are closed and reaffirming the need for the cooperation of the States, in particular the former Yugoslavia, in order to arrest Goran Hadzic, who was at the time still at large (he was eventually caught on 20 July 2011.) Resolution 1993 pays tribute to the States that agree to house in their prisons those persons sentenced by the ICTY and urges the other States to accommodate the Tribunal’s requests in this respect.


- On 27 June 2011, the International Criminal Court issued three arrest warrants for Muammar Qaddafi, his son Saif Al-Islam Qaddafi and his chief of internal security, Abdullah al-Senussi, for crimes against humanity (murder and persecution) committed in February 2011.


- On 26 February 2011, the Security Council unanimously adopted resolution 1970, referring a situation to the ICC Prosecutor for the second time.

2. Overview Retour à la table des matières

The International Criminal Court (ICC) was established in 1998 and came into force on 1 July 2002. France signed the Rome Statute on 18 July 1998, and ratified it on 9 June 2000, following unanimous approval by the Parliament. 122 countries are Parties to the Statute (as of 15 February 2013), including most of the African countries and all members of the European Union.

The ICC was established to ensure that the most serious crimes – genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and crimes of aggression – do not go unpunished, wherever they are committed. The Review Conference of the Rome Statute in Kampala in June 2010 amended the Rome Statute so as to include a definition of the crime of aggression and the conditions under which the Court could exercise jurisdiction with respect to this crime. The actual exercise of jurisdiction is subject to a decision to be taken in 2017.

France helped to introduce provisions into the Rome Statute that are new in comparison with the statutes of the two international criminal tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda. These include the establishment of a Pre-Trial Chamber, the participation of the victims in all stages of the proceedings and the possibility for the court to award compensation or indemnification.

In contrast to the two international criminal tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, which are subsidiary organs of the Security Council, the ICC functions independently of the United Nations system. The activities of the ICTY and the ICTR are debated in public meetings at the Security Council on a twice-yearly basis with verbal reports given by the Presidents and Prosecutors of both tribunals. However, statutory links exist between the ICC and the United Nations. Thus the Assembly of States Parties can meet at the United Nations Headquarters. Most importantly, the Security Council has the authority to refer a case to the Court (article 13 of the Statute). The Security Council can also, through a resolution under Chapter VII of the Charter, defer an investigation or proceedings for a year (article 16 of the Statute).













The International Criminal Court - La Haye, Netherlands -Photo/ICC




Ongoing cases Retour à la table des matières

There are 7 situations currently before the court: Democratic Republic of Congo, Uganda, and the Central African Republic (on the basis of a referral by the States concerned); Darfur in Sudan (resolution 1593) and Libya (on the basis of a referral to the Security Council); and the Republic of Kenya and Côte d’Ivoire (on the Prosecutor’s own initiative).

The Democratic Republic of Congo:

Four cases are currently being examined by the relevant chambers. The defendants Thomas Lubanga Dyilo, Germain Katanga and Mathieu Ngudjolo Chui are currently being detained by the Court.

On 22 March 2013, Bosco Ntaganda, former military leader of the Forces Patriotiques pour la Libération du Congo (Patriotic Forces for the Liberation of Congo), surrendered himself voluntarily and is now in the ICC’s custody.

On 16 December 2011, Pre-Trial Chamber I agreed by majority not to confirm the charges against Calixte Mbarushimana.

Uganda:

On 8 July, the ICC issued an arrest warrant for Joseph Kony, leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) for war crimes and crimes against humanity perpetrated during the uprising in northern Uganda between 2002 and 2004. The ICC issued additional arrest warrants for Okot Odhiambo and Dominic Ongwen, the top leaders of the LRA.

Central African Republic:

The trial of Jean Pierre Bemba Gombo, President and Commander-in-Chief of the Mouvement de Libération du Congo (Movement for the Liberation of Congo) began on 22 November 2011 in The Hague. He is accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity, including mass rape committed in the Central African Republic between 26 October 2002 and 15 March 2003.

Sudan:

France played a key role in the adoption of resolution 1593 on 31 March 2005 which led to the first referral to the ICC by the Security Council. This referral related to the crimes committed in Darfur and resulted in the issuing of 4 arrest warrants by the ICC for Ahmed Haroun, Sudanese Minister of State, Ali Kushayb, head of the Janjaweed militia group; Abdallah Banda and Saleh Jerbo, the rebel leaders accused of having led an attack against the peacekeeping forces. The ICC issued an arrest warrant for Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir for genocide on 12 July 2010 (this was the ICC’s first arrest warrant for genocide).

On 2 December 2011, the ICC issued an arrest warrant for Sudan’s current Defense Minister, Abdel Rahim Muhammad Hussein, for war crimes and crimes against humanity perpetrated in Darfur from August 2003 to March 2004.

Libya:

On 27 June 2011, the ICC issued three arrest warrants for Muammar Qaddafi, Saif Al-Islam Qaddafi and Abdullah al-Senussi for crimes against humanity (murder and persecution) committed in February 2011. On 22 November 2011, Pre-Trial Chamber I ordered that the case against Muammar Qaddafi be closed following his death.

Republic of Kenya:

William Samoei Ruto, former Education Minister, Henry Kiprono Kosgey and Joshua Arap Sang are awaiting an ICC decision; they are accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity committed during the post-election violence in Kenya in January 2008. Likewise, Francis Kirimi Muthaura, Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta, and Mohammed Hussein Ali, who have been charged with crimes against humanity, are still awaiting an ICC decision.

Côte d’Ivoire:

The ICC issued an arrest warrant on 23 November 2011 for Laurent Gbagbo for crimes against humanity following the Ivorian presidential elections in November 2010. Laurent Gbagbo’s first appearance took place on 5 December 2011 in The Hague.

3. The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia Retour à la table des matières

The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) was established under United Nations Security Council Resolution 827 (1993). This resolution was adopted in response to the threat to peace and international security posed by the serious violations of international humanitarian law committed in the territory of the former Yugoslavia beginning in 1991. The headquarters of the ICTY was set up in The Hague (the Netherlands). It was the first international war crimes tribunal since the Nuremberg and Tokyo tribunals.

Radovan Karadzic, former political leader of the Bosnian Serbs, was arrested in July 2008 and transferred to The Hague. He is accused of war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide during the Bosnian war (1992-1995). His trial started in March 2010. The Serbian authorities arrested Ratko Mladic on 26 May 2011 and Goran Hadzic on 20 July 2011.

The Security Council had established a completion strategy for the Tribunal’s work with a projected completion date of the end of 2008 for all first instance trials and the end of 2010 for the appeals. However, it became clear that it would not be possible to achieve these deadlines due to constraints on the proceedings, legal uncertainties and the delayed arrest of fugitives.

On 29 June 2010, the Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution (1931) extending until 31 December 2011 the mandate of permanent trial judges and until 31 December 2012 the mandate of appeals judges.

4. International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda Retour à la table des matières

Recognizing that serious violations of humanitarian law were committed in Rwanda, and acting under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter, the Security Council created the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) through resolution 955 (1994) of 8 November 1994. The purpose of this measure was also to contribute to the process of national reconciliation in Rwanda and to the maintenance of peace in the region. The ICTR was established to prosecute those responsible for acts of genocide and other serious violations of international humanitarian law committed in the territory of Rwanda, and of Rwandan citizens suspected of such acts or violations of international law committed in the territory of neighboring States between 1 January and 31 December 1994. The headquarters of the ICTR is in Arusha.

In the same way as for the ICTY, the deadline for the completion of the ICTR’s work was pushed back to the first half of 2013, as a result, in particular, of the difficulties encountered in referring the lower-ranking accused to the national courts. It emerged at the meeting of the Security Council on 3 December 2009 that this deadline might not be met (due in particular to the arrest of two fugitives in August and October 2009).

On 29 June 2010, the Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution (1932) extending until 31 December 2011 the mandate of permanent trial judges and until 31 December 2012 the mandate of appeals judges.


- The activities of the ICTY together with those of the TPIR are debated in public meetings at the Security Council on a twice-yearly basis with verbal reports given by the Presidents and Prosecutors of both tribunals.

- The informal working group of the Security Council on the International Criminal Tribunals conducts work on the legacy of these courts and prepares Council decisions on the management of their residual functions after their closure. In view of the completion of the ICTY and ICTR activities, the Security Council adopted on 22 December 2010 resolution 1966 which requests the Courts to complete their work by 31 December 2014 and establishes a "Residual Mechanism" to carry out a number of their essential functions after their closure, "including the trial of fugitives who are among the most senior leaders suspected of being most responsible for crimes".

Resolution 1966 sets the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals as a small and temporary entity with two branches, which are scheduled to start functioning by 1 July 2012 for the ICTR branch and 1 July 2013 for the ICTY branch.

5. Special Courts Retour à la table des matières

Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL)

The Special Court for Sierra Leone was established jointly by the Sierra Leone government and the UN in order to try those who bear the greatest responsibility for serious violations of international humanitarian law and Sierra Leonean law committed in the territory of Sierra Leone since 30 November 1996, during the civil war. Following the adoption of Security Council resolution 1315 of 14 August 2000, the SCSL was established in 2002. The court forms an integral part of Sierra Leone’s legal system; it is a hybrid court combining international law and Sierra Leonean law. For more information see our page on Sierra Leone.


The Special Court for Sierra Leone - Freetown, Sierra Leone - Photo/SC-SL


Special Tribunal for Cambodia (ECCC)

In 1997, the Cambodian government requested the assistance of the UN in order to prosecute the former leaders of the Khmer Rouge for crimes committed between 1975 and 1979, a period in which almost a quarter of the Cambodian population perished.

The negotiations led to the adoption by the General Assembly, on 13 May 2003, of a resolution approving a draft agreement between the UN and Cambodia (A/RES/57/228 B), followed by the signing on 6 June 2003 of a bilateral agreement leading to the creation of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, more commonly known as the Special Tribunal for Cambodia. The agreement became final in April 2005 following a donors’ meeting which resulted in pledges covering virtually all of the voluntary international contributions needed.

The ECCC, which began its work on 3 July 2006, is a hybrid court; the bodies of this court have as many Cambodian staff members as international ones. International standards are applied.

The slow emergence of this court meant that it was not possible to try a number of Khmer Rouge leaders, who have, in the meantime, died; Pol Pot is a notable example. However, other senior officials are still alive and can be prosecuted.

On 26 July 2010, the Special Tribunal for Cambodia handed down its first verdict and condemned Kaing Guek Eeav (alias "Duch"), head of the Tuol Sleng prison in Phnom Penh from 1975 to 1979, to 30 years in prison for “murder, torture and crimes against humanity.” A second case was brought before the Tribunal; this case brought together Nuon Chea (former Prime Minister of Democratic Kampuchea, then former President of the Assembly of Democratic Kampuchea), Khieu Samphan (former President of Democratic Kampuchea), Ieng Sary (former Deputy Prime Minister and former Foreign Minister) and Ieng Thirith (former Minister of Social Affairs, wife of Ieng Sary). On 16 September 2010, the ECCC has indicted these four persons. They will be tried for crimes against humanity, genocide, war crimes, murder, torture and religious persecution. Their trial begun on 27 June 2011.

On September 2012, Ieng Thirith was ruled mentally unfit to stand trial and was released from prison. On 14 March 2013, Ieng Sary died before the case could be finished.

Pre-Trial Chamber Opening Session - Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia - ECCC Photo - 13 June 2007


Special Tribunal for Lebanon

Resolution 1757 (2007) created the Special Tribunal for Lebanon to prosecute those responsible for the attack of 14 February 2005 which resulted in the death of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri. The Tribunal began its work on 1 March 2009. According to the resolution, the progress of work of the Special Court will be reviewed within three years after its establishment (ie before March 2012), in consultation with the Security Council. The duration of its activities will be extended if necessary.

(February 2014)

6. French statements Retour à la table des matières

- 15 November 2013 - Security Council - Kenya/ ICC - Explanation of position - Statement by Mr. Gérard Araud, Permanent Representative of France to the United Nations

- 12 June 2013 - Security Council - Debate on the International Criminal Tribunal for former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and for Rwanda (ICTR) - Statement by Mr Martin Briens, Chargé d’Affaires a.i of France to the United Nations

- 5 December 2012 - Security Council - ICTY/ICTR - Statement by Mrs Béatrice Le Fraper du Hellen, first Counsellor of France to the United Nations

- 17 October 2012 - Security Council - The promotion and strengthening of the rule of law in the maintenance of international peace and security - Statement by Mr. Gérard Araud, Permanent Representative of France to the United Nations

- 9 October 2012 - Security Council - Special Court for Sierra Leone - Statement by Mr Martin Briens, Deputy Permanent Representative of France to the United Nations

- 7 June 2012 - Security Council - ICTY/ICTR - Statement by Mrs Béatrice Le Fraper du Hellen, Counsellor for legal issues for the permanent mission of France to the United Nations

- 19 January 2012 - Security Council - The promotion and strengthening of the rule of law in the maintenance of international peace and security - Statement by Mr Gérard Araud, Permanent Representative of France to the United Nations

- 14 December 2011 - Assembly of States Parties to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court - General Debate - Statement by by Mr. Martin Briens Deputy Permanent Representative of France to the United Nations

- 7 December 2011 - Security Council - International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia - Statement by Mr. Martin Briens, Deputy Permanent Representative of to the United Nations

- 6 June 2011 - Security Council - International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia - Statement by Mrs. Béatrice Le Fraper, Counsellor for Legal Issues of the Permanent Mission of France to the United Nations

- 27 May 2011 - Arrest of Ratko Mladić - Statement to the press by Mr Gérard Araud, President of the Security Council

- 27 May 2011 - Arrest of Bernard Munyagishari in DRC - Remarks to the press by Mr Gérard Araud, President of the Security Council

- 6 December 2010 - 9th session of the Assembly of States Parties to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court - Statement by Mr. Gérard Araud, Permanent Representative of France to the United Nations

- 6 December 2010 - Security Council - International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia - Statement by Mr. Martin Briens, Deputy Permanent Representative of France to the United Nations

- 18 June 2010 - Security Council - International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia - Statement by Mrs. Béatrice Le Fraper, Counsellor for Legal Issues of the Permanent Mission of France to the United Nations

- 3 December 2009 - Security Council - International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia - Statement by Gérard Araud, Permanent Representative of France to the United Nations

- 4 June 2009 - Security Council: ICTY and ICTR - Statement by Mr. Jean-Pierre Lacroix, Deputy Permanent Representative of France to the United Nations

- 3 December 2008 - Security Council - ICC Prosecutor briefing - Statement by Ambassador Jean-Maurice Ripert, Permanent representative of France to the UN

- October 2008 - 63rd session of the General Assembly - Statements made in the 6th Committee

7. Reference documents Retour à la table des matières

- 18 December 2013 - Security Council - Resolution 2130 (2013) - extending the mandate of ICTY judges until 31st of December 2014

- 22 March 2013 - Security Council - Press statement - Surrender of Bosco Ntaganda to the International Criminal Court.

- 12 December 2012 - Resolution 2080 - extending the tenure of five judges of ICTR

- 29 June 2012 - Resolution 2054 - renewing the mandate of three judges of ICTR

- 29 February 2012 - Resolution 2038 - appointing Mr. Hassan Bubacar Jallow from Gambia as Prosecutor of the International Residual Mechanism

- 21 December 2011 - Resolution 2029 (2011) - renewing the mandate of the judges of ICTR

- 29 June 2011 - Resolution 1993 - renewing the mandate of the judges of ICTY

- 22 December 2010 - Resolution 1966 - establishing the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals to finish the remaining tasks of the Tribunals for Rwanda and the Former Yugoslavia

- 14 December 2010 - Resolution 1955 - renewing the mandate of the judges of ICTR

- 14 December 2010 - Resolution 1954 - renewing the mandate of the judges of the ICTY

- 9 December 2010 - Security Council - Sudan / Report of the Secretary-General - Statement by M. Luis Moreno-Ocampo, Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court

- 29 June 2010 - Resolution (1932) - renewing the mandate of the judges of TPIR

- 29 June 2010 - Resolution (1931) - renewing the mandate of the judges of the ICTY

- 11 June 2010 - Security Council - Sudan / Report of the Secretary-General - Statement by M. Luis Moreno-Ocampo, Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court

- 31 March 2005 - Security Council resolution 1593 - The Security Council submits its first case before the ICC

- 16 July 2008, Brussels - Declaration by the Presidency on behalf of the EU to mark the 10th anniversary of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court

- 17 July 1998 - Rome Statute of the ICC

- 8 November 1994 - Security Council resolution 955 - Creation of the ICTR

- 25 May 1993 - Security Council resolution 827 - Creation of the ICTY

8. Useful links Retour à la table des matières

- Link to the “international justice” section on the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs website

- Link to the “international law” section on the United Nations website

- Link to the ICC website

- Link to the ICTY website

- Link to the ICTR website

- Link to the Special Court for Sierra Leone

- Link to the Special Court for Cambodia

- Link to the Special Court for Lebanon



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